Something about those numbers.

It never fails to surprise me when I hear of the claim “we need more female CEOs” in the workplace.

I’m always left asking the question: Why not more plumbers, police and ambulance operators?

I’ve recently been working my way through Warren Farrell’s-The Myth of Male Power– in which he details the risks in the workplace of which men routinely take the burden. He describes this societal dynamic as “My body, not my choice”.

It’s an interesting concept.

I remember seeing a graphic on the wall of the medical centre at a recent work site I was on stating that the current workplace fatality rate was above 90% for the males in the industry in Australia.

Every construction site I’ve been on, in the 17 years I’ve been in this industry, has a gender imbalance of males. Why is that the case? Does the feminist academia and political scene have something to say about this aspect?

Dr. Farrell offers the concept of the financial womb that males provide society. And with that the comes the risks of injury and fatality that each sector of the economy inherently contains.

Tonight, I’ve read a blog post by Jim Rose detailing the workplace injury/fatality rates by gender in New Zealand for 2015.

“all but three of the fatal workplace accidents in NZ were men”.

Here’s the link to provide some support to what I’m talking about,

Workplace deaths/injuries in New Zealand for 2015.

As the saying goes, this ain’t my first rodeo. I’ve been on enough of this projects to know better and I’m slowly racking up a number of jobs I’ve walked away from due to safety concerns.

And it’s hard sometimes when you consider the old “harden the fuck up” cliché and the financial aspect of the role you take on as a male worker.

I’ve had female friends (in defence of the feminist stance) describe this as an aspect of the famed patriarchy doing its thing and I believe there’s a part truth there in that claim.

But what stuns me is the lack of realisation, that there’s a whole lot of women in our community that’ll go along quietly with this, as the economic security provided by that patriarchy supports the matriarchy that walks hand in hand with it.

This to me, is one of the more spineless aspects of feminism.

The claim for money and power, inherent in feminism’s edicts, in pursuit of the ideal of equality, is baseless until they recognise the risk/hazard factor that exists in the modern economy regarding the grunt work that makes the wheels of industry turn.

I’ll believe that the average feminist has the courage of their convictions, when I see the gender imbalance on construction sites, weighted in favour of their claimed equality and we all see as a society women embracing employment outside of the usual occupations that females seem to dominate.

Some how I don’t think we’ll be seeing any changes soon.

Recently.

I’ve taken a short term gig, out west of here, at a place named Chillagoe. It’s the same old, same old as far as construction work in the resource sector goes.

One thing about Chillagoe, the internet access is shite.

 As in pretty much useless between 17:30- 0730.

This is playing havoc with the diploma. The econ part of it goes down alright, when there’s some reliable contact with the modern world. Playing catch up for three weeks of absecence gets kinda exciting when you try to cram those three weeks into a couple of days.

The cutoff for the econ tests I had to complete was 11:45 20/04. 

I can reall answering the last question at 11:44. 

The fun stuff I get up to on my R’n’R. 

Back once again,

To my version of civilisation.

To be quite honest, I was surprised at how happy I was to see the east coast of Australia, on the flight back from Weipa.

It wasn’t the usual FIFO “going home” feel that one may have experience when returning home

Now, I’ve gotta coallate my thoughts on the last two weeks and go meet with my temporary employer and let them know why I’ve withdrawn from the project they assigned me too.

This’ll include a reference or three to the relevant Acts of Parliment (relating to my trade and OH&S) plus a healthy dose of my own experience from my professional background.

Let’s hope it’s constructive.

The wind down.

I’m done with this one. The scenery here is home to me as I’m from up the Gulf way but the project I’m on doesn’t meet my long developed standards of performance.

The saying goes “Prior planning prevents piss poor performance” and what I’ve seen so far on this project has confirmed that cliche nearly every day so far.

This episode has left me disappointed as this project should’ve been an easy one to roll up quickly but the company I’ve been hired too doesn’t seem to have their planning and resourcing capabilities developed to a level that enables them to prevent delays or react to any incurred or potential negative aspects that are inherent to this industry.

We all come across these types in the environments we find our employment in, we’ve all got these experiences. 

No big deal really. That’s life. That’s humans for ya.

You learn how to manage these issues in a professional manner, although I’m embarrassed to say that I was blindsided with this one. 

I’ll learn to ask “those” questions next time before I sign on.

Dusk in the ghetto.

I’m currently enjoying the accomodation at a location called Rocky Point here in Weipa.

I’m here for work.

It’s a little old. And by that I mean it looks like it was built in the 70s. 

It probably was.

It has shared ablutions for the rooms here. And modern construction workers hate that shit. Ya never know what you’re standing in while ya shower.

Happy thoughts ain’t it.